MATSYS

Posts Tagged ‘Scripting’

Shellstar Pavilion


Date: 2012
Size: 8m x 8m x 3m
Materials: 4mm Translucent Coroplast, Nylon Cable Ties, Steel Foundations, PVC and Steel Reinforcement Arches
Tools: Rhino, Grasshopper, Kangaroo, Python, Lunchbox, Rhinoscript
Location: Wan Chai, Hong Kong
Event: Detour 2012

Description:
Shellstar is a lightweight temporary pavilion that maximizes its spatial performance while minimizing structure and material. Commissioned for Detour, an art and design festival in Hong Kong in December 2012, the pavilion was designed to be an iconic gathering place for the festival attendees. Located on an empty lot within the Wan Chai district of Hong Kong, the design emerged out of a desire to create a spatial vortex whereby visitors would feel drawn into the pavilion center and subsequently drawn back out into the larger festival site. Working fully within a parametric modeling environment, the design was quickly developed and iterated with the 6 weeks of design, fabrication, and assembly. The design process can be broken down into 3 processes that were enabled by advanced digital modeling techniques:

Form-Finding
The form emerged out of a digital form-finding process based on the classic techniques developed by Antonio Guadi and Frei Otto, among others. Using Grasshopper and the physics engine Kangaroo, the form self-organizes into the catenary-like thrust surfaces that are aligned with the structural vectors and allow for minimal structural depths.

Surface Optimization
The structure is composed of nearly 1500 individual cells that are all slightly non-planar. In reality, the cells must bend slightly to take on the global curvature of the form. However, the cells cannot be too non-planar as this would make it difficult to cut them from flat sheet materials. Using a custom Python script, each cell is optimized so as to eliminate any interior seams and make them as planar as possible, greatly simplifying fabrication.

Fabrication Planning
Using more custom python scripts, each cell was unfolded flat and prepared for fabrication. The cell flanges and labels were automatically added and the cell orientation was analyzed and then rotated to align the flutes of the Coroplast material with the principal bending direction of the surface.

Credits:
Schematic Design: Andrew Kudless / Matsys
Design Development and Prototyping: Andrew Kudless and Riyad Joucka
Fabrication and Assembly: Art Lab / Ricci Wong, Wong Sifu, Geoff Wong, Wilton Ip, Justin ling, April Lau, Andrew Kudless, Riyad Joucka, Eric Lo, John Thurtle, Garkay Wong, Felice Chap, Kenneth Cheung, Godwin Cheung, Quentin Yiu, Rena Li, Garesa Hao En, Cheryl Ceclia Lui, Huang Xinliu, Horace Cheng
3D Scanning of Built Structure: Topcon HK using a Faro Focus3D Scanner


ShellStar-7733

Photo: Dennis Lo

ShellStar-7776

Photo: Dennis Lo

ShellStar-7792

Photo: Dennis Lo

ShellStar-7813

Photo: Dennis Lo

ShellStar-7817

Photo: Dennis Lo

ShellStar-7823

Photo: Dennis Lo

ShellStar-7829

Photo: Dennis Lo

ShellStar-7849

Photo: Dennis Lo

ShellStar-7852

Photo: Dennis Lo

ShellStar-7854

Photo: Dennis Lo

ShellStar_Diagrams 1

ShellStar_Diagrams 2

ShellStar_Diagrams 3

Shell Star Assembly and Construction from Riyad Joucka on Vimeo.

Photo: 3D Scan of Shellstar: No. of scanned points: 170 Million, No. of Set-ups: 10, Scanner: FARO FOCUS3D, Scanning Time: 1.5 hrs, Data Processing: ~15 minutes, Avg. Pt. Spacing : ~5 mm

Diploid_B Lamp

Year: 2010
Size: 20″ x 20″ x 20″

Description: Working with an updated version of the script that produced the earlier Diploid Lamps, this new lamp is fabricated entirely without glue. Every connection is a locking tab that enables the lamp to be built quickly despite the nearly 1000 parts. For price, please email info@matsysdesign.com

Diploid Lamp Series

IMG_2222

IMG_2199

IMG_2188

IMG_2208

IMG_2209

IMG_2232

lex_plan_asbuilt_xray

Year: 2009
Size: 36″ x 12″ x 12″

Description: The Diploid Lamp series explores multiple patterns inspired by nature such as scales, honeycombs, and barnacles. Using parametric modeling, scripting, and digital fabrication, the light’s geometry is created, refined, and produced. Each lamp is custom designed and hand assembled from digitally fabricated paper components. The series is composed of five individual lamps and is an ongoing project.

FLUX: Architecture in a Parametric Landscape

Photo by Kory Bieg

Photo by Kory Bieg

Photo by Andy Payne

Photo by Andy Payne

Curation diagram

Curation diagram

Photo by Kory Bieg

Photo by Kory Bieg

Photo by Kory Bieg

Photo by Kory Bieg

Photo by Kory Bieg

Photo by Kory Bieg

Photo by Kory Bieg

Photo by Kory Bieg

Photo by Andy Payne

Photo by Andy Payne

Photo by Andy Payne

Photo by Andy Payne

Photo by Andy Payne

Photo by Andy Payne

Photo by Kory Bieg

Photo by Kory Bieg

Prototype Model

Prototype Model

Grasshopper Definition by Andy Payne

Grasshopper Definition by Andy Payne

Year: 2009
Location: California College of the Arts, San Francisco

Description: FLUX: Architecture in a Parametric Landscape by CCA Architecture/MEDIAlab is an exhibition that focuses on the emerging field of advanced digital design. In the last two decades of architectural practice, new digital technologies have evolved from being simply representational tools invested in the depiction of existing models of architectural space to becoming significant performative machines that have transformed the ways in which we both conceive and configure space and material. These tools for design, simulation, and fabrication, have enabled the emergence of new digital diagrams and parametric landscapes—often emulating genetic and iterative dynamic evolutionary processes—that are not only radically changing the ways in which we integrate disparate types of information into the design process, but are also significantly altering the methodological strategies that we use for design, fabrication and construction. After the early digital explosion of the 1990’s, new forms of rigor and production have entered into the field of architecture, supporting the emergence of parametric and building information modeling and the enhanced use of computational geometry and scripting that together represent the second critical wave of digital design practices. That our current models of space are far more continuous, variant and complex, is specifically a result of the tools we are using to produce them, an inevitable byproduct of the ever-expanding capacities of digital computation and related fabrication technologies as these intersect with theoretical trajectories that long ago dismantled the social, functional and technological truths of the early part of this century.

The FLUX exhibition was generated in conjunction with this year’s CCA Architecture Lecture Series focused on the integration of digital practices and design, CCA MEDIAlab’s digital workshops and the International Smart Geometry conference held in San Francisco in the spring of 2009. The content of the exhibition is organized through a series of thematic categories each of which explores a set of spatial logics that have been transformed through advanced digital practices: Stacked Aggregates, Modular Assemblages, Pixelated Fields, Cellular Clusters, Serial Iterations, Woven Meshes, Material Systems, and Emergent Environments. In this exhibit, these themes are elaborated through the presentation of 50 built works and experimental architectural projects, and are expanded by analytical diagrams and 3D printed models generated by CCA architecture students.

The FLUX installation, developed by a team of CCA faculty and students, also explores the possibilities of parametric modeling and digital fabrication through the production of the exhibition armature. Produced using CCA’s new CNC router and advanced parametric modeling techniques, the undulating structure expands and contracts as its volume extends down the center of the long nave space. Through the use of parametric modeling and a series of custom designed scripts, the installation design can be quickly updated to address new design criteria. From the thickness of the ribs to the overall twisting geometry and perforated skins, the spatial form of the armature is controlled through a complex set of relationships defined by its formal, performative, and fabrication constraints.

Official Credits
Architect: CCA Architecture/MEDIAlab
Location: San Francisco, United States
Date: 2008 – 2009

The FLUX installation, developed over 6 months by a team of CCA faculty and students, explores the possibilities of parametric modeling and digital fabrication at CCA. Produced using CCA’s brand new CNC router and advanced parametric modeling techniques, the structure undulates in plan and section producing a sense of expansion and contraction in the long Nave space. Through the use of parametric modeling and a series of custom designed scripts, the installation design can be quickly updated to address new design criteria. From the thickness of the ribs to the overall twisting geometry and perforated skins, the geometry is controlled through a complex set of relationships between its formal, performative, and fabrication constraints.

Director of Architecture: Ila Berman
Project Coordinator and Director of the MEDIAlab: Andrew Kudless
Installation Design: Kory Bieg, Andre Caradec, Andrew Kudless, Ila Berman
Exhibition Curation: Andrew Kudless with Ila Berman and Marc Fornes
Graphic Design Assistants: Jessica Gibson, Andy Payne, Melissa Spooner
Parametric Design Consultant: Andy Payne
Installation Team: Laurice der Bedrossian, Yoon Choi, Stephanie Close, Loi Dinh, David Garcia, Jessica Gibson, John Hobart-Culleton, Charlotte Hofstetter, Madaline Honig, Wayne Lin, Sandra Lopez, Mariko Low, Jen Melendez, Michelle Mucker, Andrew Peters, Jason Rhein, Ocean Rogoff, Angela Todorova, Dianne de la Torre, Michael Victoria, Olesya Yefimov
Graphic Design, Modeling and Scripting Team: Olutobi Adamolekun, Lynn Bayer, Ripon DeLeon, Anthony Diaz, Alexa Getting, Jessica Gibson, Noah Greer, Benjamin Harth, Madeline Honig, Elizabeth Jackson, Pouya Khakpour, Anna Leach, Ryan Lee, Charles Ma, David Manzanares Garcia, Ariane Mates, Andy Payne, Harsha Pelimuhandiram, Michael Perkins, Javier Rodriguez, Ricardo Ruiz, Melissa Spooner, Jessica Stuenkel, Vladimir Vlad, Duncan Young
Sponsors: SolidThinking, K Bieg Design, SUM Arch, Vogue Graphics
CNC Fabrication Support: Ryan Buyssens, Jo Slota
Consultation: Chris Chalmers, Andrew Sparks

Sky Rail

Final Prototype (Image by SUM Arch)

Final Prototype (Image by SUM Arch)

Final Design (Image by SUM Arch)

Final Design (Image by SUM Arch)

Site Diagram (Image by SUM Arch)

Site Diagram (Image by SUM Arch)

Process: Step 1: Select Guidelines

Process: Step 1: Select Guidelines

Process: Step 2: Mesh creation through script

Process: Step 2: Mesh creation through script

Process: Step 3: Convert to Polysurface

Process: Step 3: Convert to Polysurface

Process: Step 4: Convert to Mesh and Weld Seams

Process: Step 4: Convert to Mesh and Weld Seams

Process: Step 5: Smooth Mesh

Process: Step 5: Smooth Mesh

View inside the railing of the twisting holes

View inside the railing of the twisting holes

Prototype image showing the angled aperatures

Prototype image showing the angled aperatures

Year: 2007-2008
Location: San Francisco

Description: Matsys was hired as a computational geometry consultant by SUM Arch on this residential project to help create tools to design a stair railing. Using a series of user-generated guidelines, the script builds a irregular cellular pattern of apertures on the railing. Based on a field of attractors, the apertures rotate in the plane of the railing causing the entire railing to open towards certain views as a person walks up or down the stair. Dozens of script iterations were explored before the final design was achieved.

Branching HyPar

IMG_0812

IMG_0971

IMG_0987

IMG_0890

IMG_0964

At the event. Photo: Craig Scott

At the event. Photo: Craig Scott

Video projections by Chris Larson

Video projections by Chris Larson

Branching points at balconies

Branching points at balconies

DSC_0296

Plan

Plan

BAM_s7_v01

Early renderings of design

Early renderings of design

BAM_s01_v02

BAM_s01_v03

BAM_s01_v04

Year: 2008
Location: Berkeley Art Museum

Description: From artists such as Naum Gabo to architects such as Antoni Gaudi, Felix Candela, and Frei Otto, the geometric entity known as a hyperbolic paraboloid has emerged as something that is both formally evocative and easily constructible. Although composed of only straight lines, the hyperbolic paraboloid traces a complexly curved surface. For this installation, the central space of the Berkeley Art Museum is tied together with a series of HyPar surfaces that emerge from the upper levels and then bifurcate at each balcony, framing a series of video projections.

The installation was created to celebrate the 30th anniversary of the Matrix, the contemporary art department of the Berkeley Art Museum. Although it was only commissioned for a one-night party on April 25, 2008, the curators of the museum decided to keep it up for a few months. The installation consists of around 15,000′ of nylon rope, 4 steel frames, 4 laser-cut acrylic column braces (affectionately knowns as the “armadillos”), and 4 amazing videos created by Chris Lael Larson of Natural Lighting in Portland.

Design and Fabrication
Andrew Kudless of Matsys

Design Collaborators
Lisa Iwamoto and Craig Scott of IwamotoScott

Steel Fabrication
Joel Hirschfeld of Hirschfeld Fabrications

Motion Graphics Design
Chris Lael larson of Natural-Lighting.com

Engineering Consultation
Andrew Sparks

Installation Team
Michael Chang
John Kim
Thien Mac
Pia-Jacqlyn Malinis
Ashley Matsu
Natsuki Matsumoto
Plamena Milusheva
Azadeh Omidfar
Colleen Paz
Aaron Poritz
Eleanor Pries

SmartCloud

Physical prototype by Cook + Fox

Physical prototype by Cook + Fox

Digital prototype: natural light

Digital prototype: natural light

Digital prototype: artifical light

Digital prototype: artifical light

Digital prototype: night lighting

Digital prototype: night lighting

Labeling system for prototype

Labeling system for prototype

sk_08_diagram-4

Ceiling plan of built prototype

Ceiling plan of built prototype

Unrolled cells for laser-cutting

Unrolled cells for laser-cutting

Early design prototypes

Early design prototypes

Early Design Prototypes: Scripts were created for each scenario for design team exploration and testing

Early Design Prototypes: Scripts were created for each scenario for design team exploration and testing

Early Design Prototypes: Fabrication issues

Early Design Prototypes: Fabrication issues

Early Design Prototype: Fabrication diagram

Early Design Prototype: Fabrication diagram

Early Design Prototype: Plan of Scheme 5

Early Design Prototype: Plan of Scheme 5

Early Design Prototype: Section through Scheme 05

Early Design Prototype: Section through Scheme 05

Year: 2007
Location: New York

Description: Matsys provided computational design consulting for Cook + Fox on this project. The project was sited in the lobby of a fashion designer’s studio in a Manhattan tower. The design team needed tools to help them model, visualize, and fabricate their design. Matsys created several rhinoscripts that could be used by the design team to iteratively explore their design concept.

R_Screen

Recursive Subdivision between 5 source lines

Recursive Subdivision between 5 source lines

test_01

test_02

rail_full_M2_02

Year: 2007
Location: New York

Description: Over the last 5 years there have been a large number of projects dealing with the population of components on a surface. To a large extent, most follow a simple UV (distorted grid) across a curved surface. Even most projects that do not appear to use a rectangular grid (like my very own Honeycomb projects) are still tied to the UV grid. This short research project explored a tiling system that does not use a regular UV grid as the underlying framework for the component population. Instead, the system works with a series of user-generated frames and recursive sub-divisions within that frame. The user sets how many generations of recursion as well as the number of subdivisions at each generation of recursion. The result is a highly non-uniform cellular pattern that still allows easy component population.

The script was further developed for the Sky Rail project.

Constellations

Constellation_04 (10,000 circles) with each separate network differentially colored

Constellation_04 (10,000 circles) with each separate network differentially colored

Constellation_06: Neighborhoods

Constellation_06: Neighborhoods

Constellation_06: Circles

Constellation_06: Circles

Constellation_06: Network lines

Constellation_06: Network lines

Constellation_02

Constellation_02

Constellation_02 Detail: Circles

Constellation_02 Detail: Circles

Constellation_02 Detail: Just network lines

Constellation_02 Detail: Just network lines

Constallation_02 Detail: Circles

Constallation_02 Detail: Circles

Year: 2006
Location: Columbus, Ohio

Description: Although I have been interested in circle-packing for a few years and did physical tests exploring it earlier projects (1, 2), I had never actually worked on any packing scripts until this spring. One of my students in my Processing Matter seminar at OSU was interested in it and that got me started on helping her write a circle-packing script. It was a lot easier than I expected, or at least my version of it was. Here’s a much more sophisticated version by David Rutten.

The pseudocode of the script works like this:

Input: maximum radius of circles, number of circles to pack, boundary condition

  1. Find a random point within the boundary
  2. If any circles already exist, test if the point is within any of their boundries
  3. If not, find the distance between the point and the closest circle
  4. If the distance is greated than the maximum radius add a circle at that point with the maximum radius. This creates a new “root”
  5. If the distance is less than the maximum radius, add a circle at that point with the measured distance. This creates a new circle that is tangent with the closest circle. Draw a line between the new point and the centerpoint of the closest circle.
  6. Repeat steps 2-6 until the desired number of circles are created.

Credits: Andrew Kudless and Laura Rushfeldt

C_Wall

View from outside the gallery door

View from outside the gallery door

C_Wall with shadows on floor

C_Wall with shadows on floor

The zigzag plan of the wall creates an increased structural stiffness

The zigzag plan of the wall creates an increased structural stiffness

DSC_3371

Dense pattern of shadows

Dense pattern of shadows

IMG_1277

Process diagram

Process diagram

Year: 2006
Location: Banvard Gallery, Knowlton School of Architecture, Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio
Size: 12′ x 4′ x 8′

Description: This project is the latest development in an ongoing area of research into cellular aggregate structures that has examined honeycomb and voronoi geometries and their ability to produce interesting structural, thermal, and visual performances. The voronoi algorithm is used in a wide range of fields including satellite navigation, animal habitat mapping, and urban planning as it can easily adapt to local contingent conditions. Within our research, it is used as a tool to facilitate the translation and materialization of data from particle-simulations and other point-based data. Through this operation, points are transformed into volumetric cells which can be unfolded, CNC cut, and reassembled into larger aggregates.

Credits: Andrew Kudless and Ivan Vukcevich with Ryan Palider, Zak Snider, Austin Poe, Camie Vacha, Cassie Matthys, Christopher Friend, Nicholas Cesare, Anthony Rodriguez, Mark Wendell, Joel Burke, Brandon Hendrick, Chung-tzu Yeh, Doug Stechschultze, Gene Shevchenko, Kyu Chun, Nick Munoz, and Sabrina Sierawski, and Ronnie Parsons

Voronoi Morphologies

Prototype testing algorithm

Prototype testing algorithm

Prototype detail

Prototype detail

2.5D surface voronoi drawings

2.5D surface voronoi drawings

2.5D surface voronoi FDM model

2.5D surface voronoi FDM model

2.5D surface voronoi FDM model

2.5D surface voronoi FDM model

3D voronoi drawings

3D voronoi drawings

3D paper prototype

3D paper prototype

3D paper prototype detail

3D paper prototype detail

Plaster prototype

Plaster prototype

Plaster prototype

Plaster prototype

Year: 2005-2006
Location: Columbus, Ohio
Description: Voronoi Morphologies is the latest development in an ongoing area of research into cellular aggregate structures. The voronoi algorithm is used in a wide range of fields including satellite navigation, animal habitat mapping, and urban planning as it can easily adapt to local contingent conditions. Within our research, it is used as a tool to facilitate the translation and materialization of data from particle-simulations and other point-based data into volumetric form. Through this process, it becomes much easier to produce highly differentiated structures that are responsive to local performance criteria.

The project was developed though both 2D and 3D voronoi cellular structures. In both cases, a field of points is used to determine regions of space, or cells, that are closer to a certain point than any other point. As the cells are not constrained by a fixed geometric topology, the cells properties can be tuned in much more specific ways than a tradition rectangular or hexagonal cell arrangement. A custom-designed script was written to connect Rhino with Qhull which did the actual voronoi calculations. The script also digitally unfolds, labels, and prepares the geometry for CNC fabrication.

This technique was developed in collaboration with Jelle Feringa of EZCT Architecture and Design Research in Paris.

For more information about computing convex hulls, voronoi diagrams, and other triangulations, check out the qhull website. Qhull is used in Matlab and many other computational geometry applications.

Honeycomb Morphologies

Manifold Installation at the AA Projects Review 2004, Photo: Francis Ware

Manifold Installation at the AA Projects Review 2004, Photo: Francis Ware

Variable transparency of the wall

Variable transparency of the wall

Detail of Manifold

Detail of Manifold

Floor detail of Manifold Installation

Floor detail of Manifold Installation

Manifold Installation

Manifold Installation

Manifold Installation rendering

Manifold Installation rendering

Cut files for Manifold

Cut files for Manifold

Manifold Installation process

Manifold Installation process

Honeycomb prototypes

Honeycomb prototypes

Honeycomb Prototype detail

Honeycomb Prototype detail

Honeycomb Prototype exploring cell depth and curvature parametric link

Honeycomb Prototype exploring cell depth and curvature parametric link

Plaster form-finding model

Plaster form-finding model

Plaster form-finding model

Plaster form-finding model

Date: 2004
Location: London, UK
Description: This research was pursued as part of a MA dissertation in Emergent Technologies and Design at the Architectural Association. The central aim of the research is the development of a material system with a high degree of integration between its design and performance. This integration is inherent to natural material systems for they have been developed through evolutionary means which intricately tie together the form, growth, and behavior of the organism. In industrial material systems, the level of integration is far lower resulting in wide and potentially problematic gaps between its means of production, its geometric and material definition, and its environmental performance. This research explores integration strategies for a particular industrially produced material system for use in architectural applications.
This research develops a honeycomb system that is able to adapt to diverse performance requirements through the modulation of the system’s inherent geometric and material parameters while remaining within the limits of available production technologies. The Honeycomb Morphologies Project is based on the desire to form an integrated and generative design strategy using a biomimetic approach to architectural design and fabrication.
The system developed in this research presents an open framework through which the designer can work, enabling a more integral relationship between the various conflicting and overlapping issues in the development of an architectural project. The research represents a tool, waiting to be actively used with specific project data and embedded in a built artifact.
The Manifold installation was a large scale prototype constructed for the AA 2004 Projects Review. The installation explored the research developed in the Honeycomb Morphologies Project and extended it to a more architectural scale.
Credits: Andrew Kudless with help from Jayendra Sha, Nikolaos Stathopoulos, Giorgos Kailis, Matthew Johnson, Ranidia Lemon, Muchuan Xu, Grace Li, Scott Cahill, and Wongpat Suetrong.