MATSYS

Posts Tagged ‘Packing’

Zero/Fold Screen


Year: 2010
Size: 10′ x 10′ x 3′
Location: Kasian Gallery, University of Calgary, Canada

Description: Although digital fabrication has allowed architects and designers to explore more complex geometries, one of the byproducts has been a lack of attention to material waste. Often digitally fabricated projects are generated from a top-down logic with the parameters of typical material sheet sizes being subordinated to the end of the design process. This project attempts to reverse that logic by starting from the basic material dimensions and then generating a series of components that will minimize material waste during CNC cutting while still producing an undulating, light-filtering screen in the gallery.

Constellations

Constellation_04 (10,000 circles) with each separate network differentially colored

Constellation_04 (10,000 circles) with each separate network differentially colored

Constellation_06: Neighborhoods

Constellation_06: Neighborhoods

Constellation_06: Circles

Constellation_06: Circles

Constellation_06: Network lines

Constellation_06: Network lines

Constellation_02

Constellation_02

Constellation_02 Detail: Circles

Constellation_02 Detail: Circles

Constellation_02 Detail: Just network lines

Constellation_02 Detail: Just network lines

Constallation_02 Detail: Circles

Constallation_02 Detail: Circles

Year: 2006
Location: Columbus, Ohio

Description: Although I have been interested in circle-packing for a few years and did physical tests exploring it earlier projects (1, 2), I had never actually worked on any packing scripts until this spring. One of my students in my Processing Matter seminar at OSU was interested in it and that got me started on helping her write a circle-packing script. It was a lot easier than I expected, or at least my version of it was. Here’s a much more sophisticated version by David Rutten.

The pseudocode of the script works like this:

Input: maximum radius of circles, number of circles to pack, boundary condition

  1. Find a random point within the boundary
  2. If any circles already exist, test if the point is within any of their boundries
  3. If not, find the distance between the point and the closest circle
  4. If the distance is greated than the maximum radius add a circle at that point with the maximum radius. This creates a new “root”
  5. If the distance is less than the maximum radius, add a circle at that point with the measured distance. This creates a new circle that is tangent with the closest circle. Draw a line between the new point and the centerpoint of the closest circle.
  6. Repeat steps 2-6 until the desired number of circles are created.

Credits: Andrew Kudless and Laura Rushfeldt