MATSYS

EOES

Image from performance. Photo: Joel Thorson

Image from performance. Photo: Joel Thorson

Photo: Joel Thorson

Photo: Joel Thorson

Photo: Joel Thorson

Photo: Joel Thorson

Photo: Joel Thorson

Photo: Joel Thorson

Photo: Joel Thorson

Photo: Joel Thorson

Photo: Joel Thorson

Photo: Joel Thorson

Tahni lifting. Photo: David Clark

Tahni lifting. Photo: David Clark

Testing in Tahni's studio

Testing in Tahni's studio

Tahni checks the set out for the first time

Tahni checks the set out for the first time

Natural light in Tahni's studio

Natural light in Tahni's studio

Chris testing strength of plastic

Chris testing strength of plastic

Chris inside

Chris inside

Welding the plastic

Welding the plastic

Lifting the half-size prototype

Lifting the half-size prototype

First view of the half-size prototype

First view of the half-size prototype

Prototype of welded texture

Prototype of welded texture

Diagram of welded procedural texture

Diagram of welded procedural texture

Diagram of folding and layering of multiple sheets of plastic

Diagram of folding and layering of multiple sheets of plastic

Original inspiration image

Original inspiration image

Full Title: Endless Ocean Endless Sky Set Design
Year: 2007
Location: Portland, OR

Description: This project was commissioned by emerging choreographer Tahni Holt for her performance Endless Ocean Endless Sky. The set was designed in response to several design criteria relating to both the evocation of the choreographic aesthetic and the limits of financial and logistical constraints. From the very beginning of the design phase, we were interested in creating a minimal set that could be built and transported easily that was also able to create an evocative and mutable space for both the performers and audience. Relying heavily on the work of Ant Farm and their inflatable constructions in the 1970’s, a small 20′x40′ space was made using standard polyethylene. Additional seams and creases were welded into the plastic in order to avoid the typical balloon aesthetic of inflatables. Rather, there was a desire for the installation to be able to evoke both things that were simultaneously heavy and light (massive icebergs floating in the sea, 747’s flying through the sky, etc.). A generative algorithm was developed that would allow a fragmented pattern of creases to emerge on the surface without having to laboriously transcribe a predefined pattern on to the surface.

A short video of the last half of the performance can be found here. Other videos of the piece: 1, 2, 3.

Credits: Andrew Kudless with help from Ronnie Parsons and Chris Walker.

One Response to “EOES”

  1. […] 2008 (September issue) Projects Featured: Sky Rail, P_Wall (2006), EOES, C_Wall, Branching Hypar, Honeycomb […]